health hack
ATA

We’re all trying on some level to look better, feel great, live longer, and generally radiate health. Yet most of us find ourselves foot-dragging at the prospect of a major overhaul to our comfortable routines. What to do? Look for hacks! Health hacks are shortcuts that make getting to our destination a bit less overwhelming.

1. Take a cold shower

Sure, hot showers feel luxurious and will warm you up on a wintry day, but what else do they offer? Um, nothing. It’s cold showers that have an impressive array of benefits. And you need nothing other than a hefty dose of willpower to take advantage of them. One cold shower a day (lukewarm water won’t cut it) will improve circulation, increase metabolism, tighten pores, boost immunity and alertness, and speed recovery from a tough workout. To ease your way in, alternate between hot and cold water, a technique known as the “Scottish Shower.” Or switch over to cold water for the last couple of minutes, just like in the James Bond movies.

2. Try intermittent fasting.

You already fast to some degree without thinking about it (“break-fast,” anyone?), but 8 hours is probably your norm, less if you’re a late-night snacker. Longer bouts of fastinghave been shown to help the body remove toxins, shed pounds, even slow aging. Can’t bear the idea of 24 hours without food? Try the 16:8 technique, a more civilized approach to fasting that involves eating normally until, say, 7 p.m. and then fasting (coffee, tea, and water are fine) until 11 a.m. the next day. Choose any 16-hour period. If you’re trying to lose weight, avoid overeating when your fasting period ends; just resume your normal meals. Yes, you’ll be hungry at first, but adjusting won’t take long.

3. Eat without distractions.

For most of us, mealtime is spent multi-tasking: We mindlessly munch on chips while scanning Facebook or inhale a plate of pasta while watching Netflix. Mindful eating is the opposite. It’s the practice of paying full attention to the eating experience: recognizing your hunger and fullness cues, noticing your emotions, observing the aromas, flavors, and textures of the foods. When you eat mindfully, you naturally slow down, eat less, and enjoy improved digestion. The first step toward becoming a mindful eater is to remove distractions, so close your laptop, put away your phone, shut off the TV, and turn your full attention to the food in front of you.

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